Articles Posted in Traffic Tickets

One question we hear often is, “Do I need a traffic lawyer?” While you may not be required to hire a traffic lawyer if you receive an Illinois traffic ticket, having proper legal representation is beneficial for a numerous reasons.

A traffic attorney can listen to the facts of the case, review the ticket(s) that you were issued, review your prior driving record and determine the best course of action. A knowledgeable traffic attorney should be able to tell you the potential consequences of the ticket and appropriate strategy. For example, minor traffic tickets may result in a driver’s license suspension either based on your past record or simply due to the type of offense. A traffic attorney should know the precise effect a ticket may have on your driving record and driving privileges and the best way to avoid any negative consequences.

Under the right circumstances, if a legal defense exists, a traffic attorney can argue your case at trial. If the case is not appropriate for trial, an attorney may be able to negotiate a favorable agreement with the prosecutor. An attorney will typically have the ability to discuss your ticket and any mitigating circumstances with the prosecutor prior to stepping in front of a judge.

A Class B misdemeanor in Illinois carries a maximum penalty of up to 6 months (180 days) imprisonment in county jail and a maximum fine of $1,500 plus any mandatory court costs. The defendant may be placed on a period of court supervision, conditional discharge or probation for a maximum of 2 years. Sentencing guidelines for a Class B misdemeanor can be found under Illinois law 730 ILCS 5/5-4.5-60.

Speeding 26 to 34 mph over the posted speed limit is one of the most common Class B misdemeanor offenses in Illinois. This offense is also referred to as aggravated speeding, excessive speeding or misdemeanor speeding. Overall, Class B misdemeanors are actually far less common than Class A misdemeanors in Illinois.

Although Class B misdemeanors are not as severe as Class A misdemeanors or felony offenses, they are still criminal charges carrying serious potential consequences. Any criminal conviction on your record may have long term consequences on your personal or professional life.

Drivers under 21 years old will have their driver’s license suspended by the Illinois Secretary of State if they receive two traffic ticket convictions within a period of two years (24 months). Illinois law holds drivers younger than 21 years old to a higher standard than other drivers.

Primarily, convictions for moving violations under the Illinois Vehicle Code count toward a license suspension. The offense does not need to occur within the State of Illinois. Out-of-state traffic tickets received by the driver may also be reported back to Illinois and used by the Secretary of State to impose a license suspension.

It is important to note that the Illinois Secretary of State uses the date the traffic ticket was issued, not the date that the conviction was entered to determine if the offenses occurred within the 24-month time period.

This post is for informational purposes only. We are a law firm and CANNOT pay your Cook County traffic ticket.

The Clerk of the Circuit Court of Cook County provides the following website that will allows you to pay certain traffic tickets for a conviction, request traffic school (if you are eligible) or request a court date: CLICK HERE.

This website currently does NOT allow you to pay fines that were assessed in court. It can only be used prior to your court appearance within the timeframe allowed, which is usually listed in the instructions on the back of your ticket (typically 14-21 days from date of issuance). You cannot use the system for tickets that are marked “Must Appear”.

According to the Illinois Secretary of State, traffic tickets for moving violations will stay on your Illinois driving record for four to five years from the date of conviction. Moving violations include offenses such as speeding, disobeying a stop sign, disobeying a traffic control light, and improper lane usage.  The Secretary of State generally  removes these offenses at their discretion during that timeframe.

Traffic tickets that result in a suspension or revocation will stay on your driving record for at least seven years from the date of license reinstatement. Convictions for alcohol and drug-related offenses (i.e. DUI) will permanently stay on your Illinois driving record.

Only court supervision or a dismissal will prevent a traffic ticket from showing up on your public driving record in Illinois. Convictions not only count toward the suspension of your driver’s license, but can significantly effect insurance premiums. An Illinois traffic attorney can often increase the chances of keeping your driving record clean. Contact The Davis Law Group, P.C. if you have received an Illinois traffic citation.