Articles Posted in Speeding

According to the Illinois Secretary of State, traffic tickets for moving violations will stay on your Illinois driving record for four to five years from the date of conviction. Moving violations include offenses such as speeding, disobeying a stop sign, disobeying a traffic control light, and improper lane usage.  The Secretary of State generally removes these offenses at their discretion during that timeframe.

Traffic tickets that result in a suspension or revocation will stay on your driving record for at least seven years from the date of license reinstatement. Convictions for alcohol and drug-related offenses (i.e. DUI) will permanently stay on your Illinois driving record.

Only court supervision or a dismissal will prevent a traffic ticket from showing up on your public driving record in Illinois. Convictions not only count toward the suspension of your driver’s license, but can significantly effect insurance premiums.

The Illinois Secretary of State uses a unique system to determine driver’s license suspensions and revocations based on the number of moving violations and a point system. A driver 21 years of age or older will have their license suspended if they receive three moving violation convictions within a 12 months period, while a driver under the age of 21 will have their license suspended if they receive two moving violation convictions within a twenty-four month period.

Every moving violation is assigned a specific number of points. Once a driver reaches the number of convictions outlined above, the Secretary of State will use the total number of points accumulated to determine the duration of suspension or revocation.

For those 21 or older, if you have three convictions for traffic violations within a 12-month period your Illinois driver’s license will be suspended as follows:

The number of speeding tickets issued by Illinois State Police troopers has dropped significantly over the past 5 years according to a report by the State-Journal Register. The number of speeding tickets decreased by 40% from 211,857 in 2010 to 126,959 in 2015. In 2016, it is estimated that the Illinois State Police will issue approximately 104,000 speeding tickets.

The article analyzed data through Illinois’ Freedom of Information Act.

While the number of speeding tickets has declined, the number of traffic fatalities is up from 5 years ago. For the first time since 2008, the number of traffic fatalities in Illinois has surpassed 1,000. However, the number of fatalities is significantly lower than 15 years ago. In 2001, there were 1,414 fatalities and in the 1970’s, the numbers were typically around 2,000.

The Chicago Police Department’s “DUI Strike Force” will be patrolling Wrigleyville and Boystown from 7 P.M. on August 19 through 3 A.M. on August 20. According to the news release put out by the Chicago Police Department, the purpose of the “DUI Strike Force” is to “saturate a pre-designated area with roving police officers that continually monitor vehicular traffic for signs of impaired driving.” The force will also focus on speeding and seatbelt violations. There will be a mobile unit on-hand to conduct Breath Alcohol Tests to speed up the arrests.

If you are charged with DUI in Chicago, your case will likely be heard at the Daley Center Courthouse. Illinois DUI law is extremely complex and it is best you consult an experienced DUI attorney for help with your case. Feel free to contact our firm if you require legal assistance for DUI, or any other criminal offense.

Police Will Be Patrolling Wrigleyville For DUIS This Weekend, August 18, 2016, www.chicagoist.com

An electronic insurance verification program may soon be implemented in Illinois. This program will make it much easier for officers to catch those driving without car insurance. In 2014, the Illinois legislature established a committee to design the program, which will likely include a computer database that would be accessible to law enforcement during traffic stops. The system would allow officers to ensure you are up to date on your monthly insurance payments. Often, individuals make a down payment on their insurance, receive their insurance card, and do not follow up on monthly payments, allowing their coverage to lapse while retaining the card showing that they are insured. As of now, in order to ensure you are currently covered by insurance, officers must call the insurance company.

It is expected that the Secretary of State will adopt the rules for the program by 2016. The agency has estimated that of the 9 million licensed drivers in Illinois, 6% are uninsured.

Michigan has recently adopted a similar program, allowing police to access information on whether a vehicle is insured by running the license plate through their computer. Michigan insurance companies are required to transmit policy information twice a month, so the information provided to officers is reasonably accurate.

1. The liability of parents for underage drinking no longer only applies to residences or private property. State law will be expanded in 2015 to penalize parents who allow those under the age of 21 to consume alcohol in vehicles, trailers, campers or watercrafts under their ownership or control. Parents will face a fine of up to $2,000. If a death results, parents can face a felony charge.

2. The Illinois Tollway Authority will now have the authority to increase the speed limit to 70 mph on interstates in urban areas. The law previously passed in 2013 allowed for a 70 mph speed limit only in rural areas.

3. Individuals, including children, who suffer from seizures will be permitted to be treated with medical marijuana. Although the specific rules and regulations regarding children are not finalized, it is likely that the child will be required to obtain written certification from two doctors.

A new Illinois law eliminates the requirement that drivers post their license as bail for certain traffic tickets. The “Sign and Drive” law (Senate Bill 2583) permits the driver’s signature on the traffic citation to guarantee their appearance in court or payment of required fines.

Under the new law, the Secretary of State may still suspend the driving privileges of those drivers who fail to comply with the citation. Driver’s are no longer required to hand over their driver’s license, which for many is the only form of identification they carry. The new law, signed by Gov. Quinn on Saturday, is effective immediately.

Drivers won’t need to hand over license as bail for traffic offenses, www.chicagotribune.com, August 10, 2014

On Sunday, Governor Pat Quinn signed a bill into law restricting police departments from imposing ticket quotas on officers in Illinois. The Governor stated that officers should “not be forced to ticket motorists to satisfy a quota system” and explained that the new law will “prevent motorists from facing unnecessary anxiety when they encounter a police vehicle.” The new law applies to all ticket types including traffic tickets (i.e. speeding tickets) and parking tickets. The new law even extends to hunting and fishing citations.

Effective immediately, officers in Illinois cannot be required to issue a certain number of citations within a specific timeframe. The new law also prohibits a county or municipality from comparing the number of tickets issued by one officer to another officer for purposes of evaluating job performance. While critics argue that the law restricts departments from holding officers accountable for performance, supporters believe the law allows officers with the freedom to do their job protecting the public.

Gov. Quinn signs bill banning ticket quotas for police, www.suntimes.com, June 15, 2014

Final notice was given by Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office Wednesday before the new automated speed cameras near parks and schools we begin issuing real tickets. Some of the cameras have been running under a grace period over the last couple of months but will soon be switching to enforcement mode as early as Wednesday. However, it is now reported that speeders will be given a second chance. The system will send a warning ticket first and the driver is only fined on a second offense.

According to city officials, a $100 fine will be imposed for speeds of 11 mph or more over the limit during the initial phase. Drivers will not yet be ticketed for driving 6 to 9 mph over the limit. Drivers traveling at exactly 10 mph over the limit may face a $35 fine at this time. The city will gradually lower the speed threshold and those speeding 6-10 mph will face a $35 fine.

During the 45-day grace period, the first nine cameras near four city parks issued 222,843 warnings. According to the Tribune, if real tickets, they would reportedly have generated $13.3 million. Projected over an entire year they would have generated $106 million. City City officials argue that revenue will drop as drivers change behavior. They cite statistics demonstrating that warnings issued by the first 9 cameras decreased by 43% within the first two weeks of operation. Enforcement hours are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday in school zones and from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week near parks.

Driver’s charged with traffic offenses in Cook County should be aware of a new court initiative. Beginning in September, Cook County will provide comprehensive Secretary of State data to prosecutors on minor traffic court calls. Previously, the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office used recidivism sheets which only provided data from an offender’s Cook County county court record.

The new recidivism sheets will contain an offender’s Illinois Secretary of State driving record which includes out-of-county and potentially out-of-state traffic violations. The Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office already has full Secretary of State data for major traffic court calls (i.e. DUI, driving on suspended license, etc.). Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of Cook County Timothy Evans reportedly facilitated an agreement between representatives of the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court and the Illinois Secretary of State.

New Cook County court initiative aimed at keeping dangerous drivers off the road, Illinois Lawyer Now, www.isba.org, August 23, 2013

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