Articles Posted in Traffic Accident

A conviction for a traffic ticket resulting from an accident, which caused personal injury or death, may result in the suspension or revocation of your Illinois driver’s license. 

We often receive requests for help from drivers who have been involved in personal injury or fatal accidents and, as a result of being convicted of a minor moving violation, have unexpectedly received a notice of suspension or revocation of their driver’s license from the Illinois Secretary of State.

In many of these cases, these drivers were assured by the court, a prosecutor or even their own attorney that by pleading guilty they would suffer no further legal consequences. However, under Section 625 ILCS 5/6-204(a)(4) of the Illinois Vehicle Code and Chapter 92, Section 1040.46 of the Illinois Administrative Code, a conviction for even a minor moving violation which is the cause of a personal injury or death may result in the suspension or revocation of your driver’s license and privileges.

Typically, you are only required to appear in court if your traffic ticket is marked as “Must Appear” or “Court Appearance Required”. On most tickets, a box will be checked by the officer that confirms whether you need to appear in court. These traffic tickets will also contain a court date, time and location.  Traffic tickets that have a required court appearance are most often issued for violations which create a great potential for harm or carry mandatory minimum penalties such as an automatic driver’s license suspension. For many of these cases, it may still be possible for a traffic attorney to appear on your behalf and avoid the need for you to be personally present in court.

Traffic tickets that indicate “No Court Appearance Required” will also contain options such as how to pay the ticket or request a court date. While you may be told that these traffic violations are punishable only by a fine, there is more to first consider before just paying the ticket. Paying a moving violation will result in a conviction being reported to the Secretary of State. A conviction will appear on your public driving record and can negatively impact your insurance rates. In addition, two convictions within 24 months will result in a license suspension or revocation for drivers under 21 years of age. Three convictions within any 12 month period will result in a license suspension or revocation for those 21 years of age or older. As a result, simply paying your ticket can be a costly mistake.

The following violations are some of the most common offenses that require a court appearance in Illinois:

Lake County Traffic Attorneys

Our Lake County Traffic Attorneys provide professional representation to those issued traffic violations throughout Lake County. Lake County traffic tickets are assigned to one of three branch courthouses depending on the police department that issued the citation.

  1. Mundelein Branch Court located at 105 East State Route 83, Mundelein, IL 60060

Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) holders are often issued traffic tickets for left lane violations on the highways and tollways across the State of Illinois. The Illinois Department of Transportation has erected signage prohibiting trucks from using the far left lane in many areas. The Illinois State Police are constantly on the lookout for trucks using the far left lane.

These offenses are most commonly charged under 625 ILCS 5/11-709 of the Illinois Vehicle Code. This type of traffic ticket is typically referred to as:

  • Improper Use of Designated Lanes

Removing a traffic accident entry from your Illinois driving record may be possible. However, there are a number of questions to consider in order to determine your options. Most importantly we must know:

  • Were you issued a traffic ticket at the time of the accident?
    • If so, what was the result:

There are several new Illinois traffic laws that have taken effect recently, which all drivers should be aware of:

Texting while Driving Resulting in Injuries

This law became effective on July 1st, 2020 and provides that drivers who text while driving resulting in great bodily harm, permanent disability of disfigurement to another person are subject to a license suspension of 12 months and a minimum fine of $1,000.00.

Every year, our attorneys see a variety of important changes to Illinois traffic laws. Here are a few of the new Illinois traffic-related laws effective in 2019.

1. Your first cell phone ticket will count as a moving violation. A first offense violation of the law prohibiting the use of electronic devices while driving will be charged as a moving violation. Under previous Illinois law, this offense only constituted a moving violation after a 2nd or subsequent offense. Fines under the new law are set at $75.00 – 1st offense; $100.00 – 2nd offense; $125.00 – 4th offense; and $150.00 – 4th or subsequent offense. These fines do not include mandatory fees/court costs. This law will become effective July 1, 2019.

2. You are no longer required to sign your citation in order to be released. A person who is stopped for a petty traffic offense, which includes most ordinary traffic offenses under the Illinois Vehicle Code, is no longer required to sign the citation in order to be released. Please note that petty offenses do not include more serious traffic offenses such as DUI, Driving While Revoked or Suspended, Reckless Driving, Leaving the Scene or an Accident, Drag Racing, etc. This law became effective January 1, 2019.

The Chicago DUI defense attorneys at The Davis Law Group, P.C. have decades of combined experience representing clients facing DUI charges as well as other traffic-related cases. Our approach combines a comprehensive knowledge of Illinois DUI law with the ability to negotiate and litigate in order to secure the most favorable outcome for our clients.

Chicago DUI Defense Case Study – Cook County, Illinois

The summary below describes a recent case handled by the DUI defense lawyers at The Davis Law Group, P.C. This specific DUI arrest occurred in the City of Chicago and was litigated at the Daley Center located in downtown Chicago. This particular courthouse is officially known as the Circuit Court of Cook County’s First Municipal District.

Below are answers to frequently asked questions regarding driving records in Illinois. Driving records are different across all 50 states. Illinois driving records are maintained by the Illinois Secretary of State. They also are often referred to as driving record abstracts and motor vehicle records (MVR).

What information appears on an Illinois driving record?

  • Convictions (traffic tickets, including those issued in other states)

Courtroom etiquette has many written and unwritten rules and, as we all know, first impressions are lasting impressions, so how you appear and how you behave during your court appearance may have a significant impact on your case. In some extreme circumstances, bad behavior can result in jail time or a fine if you are found in contempt of court. To make a good first impression, you should familiarize yourself with the rules and make sure you adhere to them.

Planning for Your Day in Court

The courthouse is a place of employment for the judge and the court staff. As everybody else, they want to keep their work day smooth and efficient. By arriving on time and following the rules, you show the court the proper respect it deserves and allow the court to maintain efficiency. By doing so, you are also increasing your chances of a more favorable outcome.

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